The Real O’Neals had definitely been one of this spring’s breakout TV comedies. Now that the ABC sitcom — about the everyday foibles of a Catholic family after their middle son comes out as gay — has been picked up for a second season, star Noah Galvin is well on his way to becoming one of the most unabashedly opinionated young actors in Hollywood. In an interview with New York Magazine’s Vulture.com, the out and loud 22-year-old reads everyone from Eric Stonestreet to Bryan Singer for filth.

He makes no bones about the fact that being out has cost him at least 1 role.

“People in L.A., producers and casting directors, are not the most creative. … So when they see me play this character, they’re like, Oh, he’s really good at playing the funny gay kid. That’s what he does. Let’s have him do more of that!… One producer who watches our show was like, But he’s too gay. It was horrible. It made me feel so shitty.”

From there, the dish just gets dishier and the shade gets shadier. Galvin has no patience for L.A.’s vapid, closeted actors. And his description of Hollywood’s gay network is priceless:

“Bryan Singer likes to invite little boys over to his pool and diddle them in the fucking dark of night.”

Meanwhile, he calls Colton Haynes “the worst” for talking about coming out while never actually saying that he’s gay:

“That’s not coming out. That’s fucking pussy bullshit. That’s like, enough people assume that I sleep with men, so I’m just going to slightly confirm the fact that I’ve sucked a dick or two. That’s not doing anything for the little gays but giving them more masturbation material.”

He also cops to throwing Modern Family’s Eric Stonestreet under the bus more than once:

“He’s playing a caricature of a caricature of a stereotype of stereotype on Modern Family. And he’s a straight man in real life. And as hilarious as that character is, there’s a lack of authenticity.”

All gossip aside, probably one of the most interesting parts of the interview is when Galvin talks about the way he performs his character’s gayness. He describes the “ebb and flow” of Kenny’s flamboyance in terms of code switching, comparing it to the way he performs his own gender and sexuality in real life:

“It depends on who you’re with. If I’m with a bunch of gays, I’m going to be like, Yas queen! Yas, yas, yas! But when I’m with my brothers and we’re wrestling, I’m going to bro out. And I want Kenny to be that.”

To Haynes’ credit, he took the high road when he responded to Galvin via Instagram:colton

UPDATE:

The Real O’Neals star later tweeted a statement expressing regrets for a no-holds-barred interview published Thursday in Vulture. Hours after the interview’s release, Galvin issued an apology.

“The entire interview I gave to Vulture has hurt the LGBTQ community and the industry I feel truly fortunate to be a part of. My only intention was to try and empower and promote honesty, but I fully understand that comments I made were brazen and hurtful,” Galvin stated in the social media message.

He apologized specifically to Colton Haynes and Eric Stonestreet.

“To Colton Haynes and to the LGBTQ youth, especially those who have embraced our show, I have no right to dictate how or when anybody comes out of the closet; I know how difficult and scary the process of coming out can be, and the last thing I would ever want to do is make it scarier,” he wrote.

Galvin also posted another tweet with an apology to Bryan Singer. Galvin had referenced pool parties thrown by the out director of the X-Men franchise, implying he preyed on younger men at these events. The comments have since been removed from the Vulture piece.

“My comments were false and unwarranted. It was irresponsible and stupid of me to make these allegations against Bryan, and I deeply regret doing so.”

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